Sunday, 29 March 2009

YouTube helps Not-for-Profits

Online video-sharing site YouTube has released a 'Call to Action' function to assist not-for-profits to direct Net traffic to their websites:
This week, we launched a new "Call to Action" feature for YouTube's nonprofit partners, which allows them to use InVideo overlays to drive traffic to an off-YouTube web page, where they can collect signatures, email addresses, or even donations. Already, we're seeing nonprofit organizations use this new feature with great success.
One charity raised $10k in one day - not a bad effort!

But comments on the article which appeared in Digg suggest that not everyone is happy - some suggesting:
Welcome to YouSpam
Sure, spam is an unwelcome part of the Net, but so is junk mail through snail mail. Indeed, snail mail must be disposed of and the mantra for letterbox advertisers is:
Get your message across in the time it takes to walk from the letterbox to the recycle bin
There is a big difference between junk mail (including spam) and directing Net traffic. The YouTube 'Call to Action' function lets users choose whether or not to view the content. This 'pull' rather than 'push' advertising is one of the most refreshing approaches to marketing to develop in the New Media era.

Let's face it, marketing is one of the most important business functions and as a consumer, it is much better to be an active participant in good marketing, rather than a passive recipient of junk. It can only be a good thing for civil society if not-for-profits are able to use New Media to get their message across effectively, and for free.

The new business model which is emerging focuses on marketing, but with a philanthropic bent. New Media providers such as YouTube and Google (providing free access to global information) provide the promise of change from the old, top-down approach.

Regrettably, the program is only available in the UK & the US at the moment.

Creative Commons License Except where indicated otherwise, Le Flâneur Politique by Michael de Percy is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Australia License. Based on a work at politicalscience.com.au. Background image ©Depositphotos.com/ @redshinestudio